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Juvenile Onset Arthritis (JOA)
Treatment

JOA is treated with medicines and physical therapy. NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are used for every type of JOA. They help the swelling to go down in your joints and relieve the pain. The side effects can sometimes make you feel a bit sick, have stomach pain or get diarrhoea, but they really help with JOA.

If you have oligoarticular or systemic JOA, you are also likely to be given methotrexate, which can have side effects on your liver and bone marrow. If you have very bad JOA, your doctor may give you corticosteroids. You may take these as a pill, but sometimes they are given as injections directly into your joints, every week or so.

You might need to use physical therapy to keep your legs strong and flexible.

A physiotherapist can show you how to keep all your joints working without damaging them, and you'll be able to do some of the exercises they show you at home.